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Things Physicians Said and Did in 2015

Things Physicians Said and Did in 2015


  • Telemedicine: House Calls for the Millennium Picture a practice: no office rent, no staff salaries, no malpractice premiums, no waiting for patient or doctor, flexible schedule, all cash reimbursement with direct deposit, thank-you notes. Imagination or reality? Dr Andrea Brand describes her dream practice in virtual reality: telemedicine, the house call in cyberspace. Telemedicine: House Calls for the Millennium

  • 5 Top Medical Books of All Time Looking for a foundational read in radiology or infectious disease? A compendium of minor emergencies and their treatments? Internal medicine specialist Mark Yoffe, MD, in his spare time, reviews reams of print and digital medical texts which he ranks on his web site for their enduring contribution to medical education. 5 Top Medical Books of All Time

  • A Neurologist on a Medical Mission As a member of an annual medical mission to rural areas of the Phillippines, neurologist Dr Andrew Wilner treated 100 of the average 800 patients seen every day at makeshift clinics. He shares photographs and writes about the stark contrasts in safety and health expectations between the developed and developing worlds. A Neurologist on a Medical Mission

  • 10 Worst Medical Sentences Ever Written If you haven’t yet been called out for a nonsensical sentence in a chart note or one that obscures, or worse, changes your clinical meaning, keep practicing! In our slide show, find 10 sentences dissected from articles submitted by physicians to this Web site as they were originally written. Say what? 10 Worst Medical Sentences Ever Written

  • The Annual Physical: RIP? In a thoughtful rejoinder to New York Times Op Ed writer Ezekiel Emanuel’s complaint about the expensive American love affair with the “annual physical,” Gregory Rutecki, MD, notes that not lauding the annual check-up is not the same as saying the skill of physical examination is passé. He hews to the traditional—and today evidence-based—view that a careful, methodical history and a hands-on physical exam will point to a diagnosis. The Annual Physical: RIP?

  • Preventing Overdiagnosis 2015 Watchful waiting used to be a valid treatment strategy but with technology available to assess innumerable symptoms, why wait? Allen Frances, MD is a trenchant observer of the business of medicine. In his blog, he parses the issues raised at the PREVENTENING OVERDIAGNOSIS 2015 conference. Hear him roar. Preventing Overdiagnosis 2015

  • Do Physician Health Programs Increase Physician Suicide? Family physician Pamela Wible, MD, is on a campaign to re-establish the human-ness of medicine. Raising the visibility of physician and medical student suicide is a passion for Dr Wible and is matched by her effort to devise and disseminate practical solutions to the too often fatal problems of physician mental health. Do Physician Health Programs Increase Physician Suicides?

  • Four Things I Hate about EMRs A good, old-fashioned handwritten H & P told you all you needed to know and, just as important, nothing that you didn’t need to know. Pediatrician Terry Brenneman, MD, has made the switch to the digital note, but he gives voice to many common frustrations with the new technology that are widely shared in the medical community. Four Things I Hate about EMRs

 

When we looked back at a year’s worth of contributions to Consultantlive.com from physicians, a number of them stood out to us for something unique in the author’s message, mission, tone, or undertaking. The slides above share the essence of each piece and we provide a link to the original article so you can read in full.  

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