Topics:

ubmslateCL-logo-ubm

CL Mobile Menu

New Diabetes Cases Trending Down

New Diabetes Cases Trending Down

© sacura/Shutterstock.com© sacura/Shutterstock.com

New cases of diabetes are on the decline, according to new data released by the CDC.

Researchers estimated the incidence of diagnosed diabetes in the US population aged 18 to 79 years using data from the National Health Interview Survey of the National Center for Health Statistics and the CDC.

Here are the highlights of the CDC report:

The number of American adults with newly diagnosed diabetes more than tripled from 493,000 in 1980 to more than 1.4 million in 2014. From 1991 to 2009, the number of new cases of diabetes increased sharply, from 573,000 to more than 1.7 million. However, from 2009 to 2014, the number of new cases decreased significantly, to about 1.4 million.

From 1990 to 2008, the age-adjusted incidence of diabetes increased sharply. The rates more than doubled from 3.8 to 8.5 per 1000. However, from 2008 to 2014, age-adjusted incidence declined significantly, from 8.5 to 6.6 per 1000.

Among adults aged 18 to 44 years, the incidence of diabetes increased significantly from 1980 to 2003 and showed little change from 2003 to 2006. Then the incidence decreased significantly from 2006 to 2014.

In adults aged 45 to 64 years, the incidence of diabetes showed no consistent change during the 1980s and increased from 1991 to 2002. From 2002 to 2014, it leveled off.

From 1980 to 2014, in adults aged 65 to 79 years, the incidence of diagnosed diabetes nearly doubled, from 6.9 to 12.1 per 1000.

For women, the age-adjusted incidence of diagnosed diabetes has increased since the 1980s. For men, the age-adjusted incidence of diagnosed diabetes increased from the 1980s through 2009. Then, from 2009 to 2014, it decreased.

The incidence of diabetes increased significantly for women aged 18 to 44 years and those aged 45 to 64 years from 1997 to 2014. Trends were less consistent for women aged 65 to 79 years and for men at any age. Throughout the period, incidence rates were lower among those aged 18 to 44 years than among older adults.

Among Hispanics, the age-adjusted incidence of diagnosed diabetes increased from 1997 to 2009 and showed no consistent change after 2009. From 1997 to 2014, age-adjusted incidence did not significantly change among blacks. There was a difference among whites; the age-adjusted incidence of diagnosed diabetes increased significantly from 1997 to 2008 and then decreased significantly from 2008 to 2014. Throughout the period, incidence rates were lower among whites than among blacks or Hispanics.

The age-adjusted incidence of diagnosed diabetes increased among adults aged 18 to 79 years regardless of the level of education until 2010, when it decreased significantly among adults with greater than a high school education. Among adults with less than a high school diploma or those with a high school diploma or equivalent, the age-adjusted incidence appeared to decline, but not significantly. The incidence rates were higher among those with less than a high school education.

 
Loading comments...

By clicking Accept, you agree to become a member of the UBM Medica Community.