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H1N1 Resources

H1N1 Resources

This year's influenza season is approaching fast. Although the World Health Organization officially declared an end to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in August, the H1N1 virus is still circulating and is likely to continue to cause serious disease in infants, young children, pregnant women, and other high-risk groups.

This year’s influenza season is approaching fast. Although the World Health Organization officially declared an end to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in August, the H1N1 virus is still circulating and is likely to continue to cause serious disease in infants, young children, pregnant women, and other high-risk groups.

A universal vaccine that protects against all strains of influenza virus may eventually replace yearly seasonal flu shots. This vaccine has been shown to be effective in animals, report investigators from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).

This discussion reviews the currently available antivirals and recommendations for their use in influenza prophylaxis and treatment. Because our understanding of 2009 H1N1 influenza is still evolving, some off-label use of medications is discussed and noted. Information on 2009 H1N1 is updated frequently, andreaders are encouraged to monitor advisories from federal, state, and local health agencies for up-to-date information. (Drug Benefit Trends. 2010;22:10-14)

H1N1 influenza has paid an unwelcome visit to a number of nursing homes, reports the CDC.

MedImmune is recalling 13 lots of monovalent 2009 H1N1 influenza nasal spray vaccine whose potency has decreased or is expected to decrease shortly.

A single dose of 2009 influenza A (H1N1) vaccine induced protective antibody titers in more than 90% of children in an Australian study.

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