Deepak Bhatt, MD, MPH: Promising Data From the REVERSE-IT Trial

November 16, 2021
Kenny Walter

Kenny Walter is an editor with HCPLive. Prior to joining MJH Life Sciences in 2019, he worked as a digital reporter covering nanotechnology, life sciences, material science and more with R&D Magazine. He graduated with a degree in journalism from Temple University in 2008 and began his career as a local reporter for a chain of weekly newspapers based on the Jersey shore. When not working, he enjoys going to the beach and enjoying the shore in the summer and watching North Carolina Tar Heel basketball in the winter.

There was a 135% reduction in platelet inhibition observed within 5-10 minutes following bentracimab infusion.

Initial data from the REVERSE-IT (Rapid and SustainEd ReVERSal of TicagrElor – Intervention Trial) show bentracimab resulted in the reversal of the antiplatelet effects of ticagrelor in patients who present with urgent surgery or an invasive procedure or experiencing uncontrolled major or life-threatening bleeding.

The results from the 150 patient phase 3 trial were announced during the 2021 American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions as a late-breaking poster.

Bentracimab achieved the predetermined primary endpoint of immediate and sustained reversal of the antiplatelet effects of ticagrelor. There was a 135% reduction in platelet inhibition (P <0.001) observed within 5-10 minutes following bentracimab infusion. This reduction sustained throughout all timepoints over 24 hours.

In addition, more than 90% of participants achieved the co-primary endpoint of good or excellent hemostasis within 24 hours of initiation of bentracimab therapy (P <0.001).

For safety, 5.3% of patients reported thrombotic events, none of which resulted in death or were considered to be related to the treatment. The drug was well-tolerated, with 5 non-serious adverse events reported by 3 patients, the most common of which were pain associated with surgical procedures.

In an interview with HCPLive®, Deepak L. Bhatt, M.D., M.P.H., Executive Director of Interventional Cardiovascular Programs at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and professor at Harvard Medical School, explained how promising the initial results actually are.


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