Advances in the Management of Atopic Dermatitis - Episode 15

When to Change Therapy for Atopic Dermatitis

November 18, 2021
Lawrence Eichenfield, MD

,
Raj Chovatiya, MD, PhD

,
Leon Kircik, MD

,
Peter Lio, MD

,
Elizabeth Swanson, MD

A brief discussion on when it is best to switch therapy while treating patients for atopic dermatitis.

Transcript:

Lawrence Eichenfield, MD: That’s a great segue into the last segment of our discussion, which is a mixture of core questions for us to summarize where we’re at and what we’ve discussed through this session.

Let me start off. Lisa, discuss how and when you decide to make a change in therapy.

Elizabeth Swanson, MD: For me, it’s pretty straightforward. If I can’t get a patient clear or keep them clear, then I’m going to be discussing and encouraging a change because I want to make these patients’ lives better. I want to make them look better, feel better, and do better. If I can’t get them clear or keep them clear, we should try something different. Fortunately, our option list is growing longer by the day.

Lawrence Eichenfield, MD: What else? Are there other times you’d like to make a change in therapy? I’m not big on changing it because someone else already used it. About half the time, people come in and they just haven’t used enough of a medicine. I don’t necessarily write a new script, I just write a more detailed care plan and do volumetric prescribing, where I tell them a certain volume. In all of medicine but especially in dermatology conditions, what’s needed in each room isn’t just walking in, making the diagnosis, and prescribing something. Partially our decision about when to change therapy and how we change therapy is individualized according to what that particular patient might need.

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Transcript edited for clarity.

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